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Viewpoint - Diversity and Tolerance

The Missouri University of Science and Technology seeks to accommodate and respect the views and perspectives of students that may conflict with the doctrine of a discipline and its normal methodologies in a way that does not compromise the learning experience.   We strive to protect students and professors, ensuring that they are judged on their abilities and performance rather than their viewpoint, political persuasion, or religious beliefs.  As such, the University welcomes intellectual pluralism and the free exchange of ideas.  

Academic decisions including grades should be based solely on considerations that are intellectually relevant to the subject matter. Neither students nor faculty should be disadvantaged or evaluated on the basis of their political beliefs. Any member of the campus community who believes he or she has been treated unfairly regarding academic matters has access to institutional process by which his or her grievance can be addressed.

Students may report concerns involving viewpoint diversity or tolerance to the student advocate within the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs or by completing the Student Discrimination Grievance or Issues of Concern form located online at: http://communitystandards.mst.edu/grevianceform/index.html.


Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
107 Norwood Hall
320 W. 12th Street
Rolla, MO 65409
573-341-4292
stuaff@mst.edu

American Council on Education. Statement on Academic Rights and Responsibilities. June 23, 2005. http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/Statement-on-Academic-Rights-and-Responsibilities.aspx  

 

 

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DESERT EXPLORER

Michael Bouchard studies bizarre dome-like structures in Egypt's Afar Desert.

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GOING THE DISTANCE

Marathon runner Devin Dixon sped through three degrees in just over six years.

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Dr. Leslie Gertsch takes a look at humanity's future in space.

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D-DAY RE-EXAMINED

John McManus' latest book looks at the Big Red One at Omaha Beach.

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Melanie Mormile studies bacteria here on Earth that could survive on Mars.

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SPELUNKING FOR A CAUSE

Michael Bradford helps protect bats and cave formations in Missouri.

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Paul Nam suggests the potential solution to several global problems is green slime (algae).

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DANCING WITH CODE

Marquia Lewis studies computer science and is a member of the Gold Miners dance squad.

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CRAFT-Y MAGAZINE EDITOR

Casey Burton works to improve cancer screenings and publishes a gamer magazine.

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Carrie Levy enjoys the mental challenge of being a Lady Miner goalkeeper.

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A PHILOSOPHY OF ADVOCACY

Kate Burns is proof that students in every major can find success.

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Joel Burken's research team use trees to detect soil and groundwater contamination.

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Anan Takroori shares his love of planes, rockets and satellites with campers.

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'DOWN-TO-EARTH' SCHOLAR

Krista Rybacki studies soil samples from an area near a lead recycling smelter.

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MINERS ABROAD

Delancey Rougely studied the effects of war in France and blogged about it.

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